News

Wed
21
Aug
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Co. Board hears complaints of irrigators spraying on Harvard-area roads

BY RITA BRHEL

This has been a tough year for county roads, but it’s not helped by improperly managed irrigation pivots.

The Clay County Board of Supervisors heard complaints from several people about the condition of gravel roads near Harvard during the board’s regular meeting on Aug. 12, at the courthouse in Clay Center.

“I just want good roads, reasonable ones anyway,” Dale Hasseloh who lives east of Harvard, said. “It’s to the point where something’s got to be done. It’s just terrible.”

 

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Wed
21
Aug
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Cardinal squad welcomes students back Aug. 13

ASHLEY D. SWANSON | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

During the annual Back-to-School Picnic Aug. 13, Harvard Public School staff welcomed students back for another year. Featured at the picnic were a bounce house, yard games, and other activities, such as the Soak ‘N’Wet, where students tried their luck at hitting a target, which would releases water onto the participants head. Carrie Coats was one of the participants, as seen here, while Jeanie Pelotte, left, stands to the side to catch bean bags.

 

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Wed
21
Aug
Edgar's picture

Big class begins EMT course Aug. 15

ASHLEY D. SWANSON | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

Sixteen people were present for the orientation training in Edgar Thursday, kicking off the threemonth EMT course. Here, CCC-Hastings instructors Sandra Schendt, left, and DeeAnn Janssen outline what the course will entail.

BY ASHLEY D. SWANSON

Sixteen people gathered at Edgar’s Fire Hall Thursday, Aug. 15, for the start of a three-month EMT training class.

Thursday’s training served as an outline for the class, with direction given by instructors Sandra Schendt and DeeAnn Janssen, of Central Community College-Hastings.

During the training, students will learn hands-on skills, read through all the required materials of information, and work close with others throughout the county.

Janssen explained Thursday how they [students] weren’t just taking the class for their own squads. Mutual aid occurs more often than not, especially in a rural county such as Clay. Going through the course and taking the final exam will benefit themselves, their communities, and each other.

 

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Wed
21
Aug
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Street work ongoing in Fairfield

RITA BRHEL | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

Several streets are closed in Fairfield as work continues on the sewer improvement project. Here, on Aug. 16, sewer replacement begins on Fourth Street near the intersection of A Street.

 

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Wed
14
Aug
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Strong winds damage property, ag land

MELISSAWHITEFOOT | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

This building sitting south of Fairfield, near Highway 74, sustained heavy damage Aug. 7, when an early-morning storm passed through the county between 3:15 and 4 a.m.

Clay County was one of several Nebraska counties hit by a severe thunderstorm in the early morning hours Aug. 7.

At 2:46 a.m., the National Weather Service in Hastings issued a Severe Thunderstorm Warning, and by about 3:30 a.m., the warning was continued until 4:15 a.m.

Different reports came in about wind gusts and speeds in Clay County, ranging from 80-90 mph, according to the NWS, while a couple of local weather monitors estimated speeds between 103 and 108 mph.

Straight line winds, mixed with heavy rain and hail, caused damage to areas throughout Fairfield, Glenvil, and Harvard, as well as surrounding farm ground.

Power was reported out in Fairfield, Glenvil, and parts of Clay Center early Wednesday morning, according to Clay County Emergency Manager Tim Lewis. Downed trees and tree limbs snapped powerline poles and fell onto lines, causing some of them to break or pull power away from buildings.

 

Wed
14
Aug
Edgar's picture

Nuss returns to Sutton Council, elected president

TORY DUNCAN | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

Sutton Mayor Todd Mau, right, presents Dave Plettner with a years of service plaque for his time on the city council.

Larry T. Nuss made a return to the Sutton City Council Monday, Aug. 12, as Nuss replaces Dave Plettner, who during the July council meeting, stepped down from his Ward 1 seat, after serving the council for nearly 21 years.

Nuss, who held one of the two Ward 2 seats on the council until moving out of the south ward in Sutton, returns to serve the council for the remainder of Plettner’s term. Nuss, who was serving as council president before, having to step down from his original Ward 2 seat, was also re-elected to the post as council president.

Council members also voted to move forward with the downtown revitalization plans with JEO Consulting. The plan will begin to help support streetscape projects, including sidewalks, lighting, and curb ramps, in addition to help assist with exterior building improvements, help to create business incubator space in the downtown area and to explore a potential childcare center in the downtown area.

 

Wed
14
Aug
Edgar's picture

Harvard Public School receives reVISION grant

Harvard is one of four schools to receive funds from the reVISION grant, which “provides Nebraska schools with the opportunity to analyze and transform their current career education systems in order to improve their ability to educate a qualified workforce that meets industry needs within an ever-changing economy,” according to the NE Department of Education website.

Originally, nine schools in ESU 9 came together to apply for the grant as a unit; however, five of those schools decided to write their own grants, leaving Harvard, Kenesaw, Adams Central, and Doniphan-Trumbull, HPS Principal Neil Riley said.

During the reVISION grant process, HPS’s Advisory Board, consisting of Riley, Scott Trimble, Chuck Conway, Kristen Berns, Michaela Bourn, and Cliff Gallant joining later, hosted a community engagement time, meeting with local businesses and those in the area students would be working with.

 

Wed
07
Aug
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QH Special Services offers chronic pain relief

Certified Nurse Practitioner Susan Kryzsko, left, and medical assistant Tammy Helgoth will be the two main faces patients see when PCR comes to Sutton’s Quality Healthcare.

Quality Healthcare’s Special Services section of the clinic has brought more options to patients in and around Sutton, instead of having to go to Grand Island or even Lincoln.

Of the special services offered, the most recent is Grand Island Pain Relief Center, which has changed the way they see their patients in terms of treatment.

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Wed
07
Aug
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Sutton hosts open house for downtown enhancement project

ASHLEY D. SWANSON | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

Jeff Ray, with JEO, explains the potential plan for Sutton’s downtown to an attendee of the Sutton Downtown Enhancement Challenge Grant open house Aug. 1.

Sutton’s Downtown Enhancement Challenge Grant Program was set out for community members during an open house Thursday, Aug. 1.

The open house detailed top results from a survey previously released, as well as showed renderings of what Saunders Avenue could possibly look like in the future.

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Wed
07
Aug
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Reducing crime an on-going goal for Harvard Police Chief

ASHLEY D. SWANSON | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

Wayne Alley, who has served as the Harvard Police Chief for a year, starting his duties in July 2018, has been working toward lowering crime rates in Harvard.

According to the 2017 census, Harvard has a little more than 960 residents, many of whom have resided in the community their entire lives, a fact Harvard Police Chief Wayne Alley sees as a town strength.

“The people who have grown up here, they love this town and don’t want to leave or move away, so there’s hometown loyalty,” Alley said.

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