News

Thu
24
Sep

Risk dial moves to ‘elevated;’ weekly case numbers rise

South Heartland District Health Department’s (SHDHD) risk dial, which is a summary of current COVID-19 conditions in the district, moved to “elevated” (orange) Wednesday, Sept. 23. The dial moved from 2.0 to 2.1.

“The risk dial is one tool we use to communicate the risk of coronavirus spread in our district,” SHDHD executive director Michele Bever said. “We encourage families, schools, work sites, event organizers and whole communities to continue to take actions to reduce the risk of spread of this coronavirus. We encourage residents to review the Risk Dial guidance for the “moderate” and “elevated” levels of risk and work to incorporate as much as you can into the things that you do and the places you go.”

Also as of Sept. 23, confirmed cases have increased to 646, 22 more than the previously reported 624 on Sept. 21.

Wed
23
Sep
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Clay County farmers begin harvest

Clay County farmers begin harvest

Bean fields were the first to be harvested in Clay County over the weekend, with several farmers and their equipment seen in the fields or moving over gravel roads.

 

 

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Wed
23
Sep
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County Board approves solar rules

Clay County is now open to solar farms, with conditions.

The Clay County Board of Supervisors approved two related resolutions during its regular meeting on Sept. 22, at the Clay County Fairgrounds in Clay Center.

The initial resolution allows the addition of solar regulations to the county’s comprehensive zoning plan. The following resolution puts in place the solar-specific rules crafted by the county zoning committee. Both measures passed 5-0-1 with board member Jim Pavelka, of Glenvil, abstaining.

 

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Wed
23
Sep
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So. Central Unified Board approves new budget

It is no easy task balancing a public school’s budget.

South Central Unified School District #5’s Board of Education voted on the 2020- 21 operating budget for Sandy Creek and Lawrence-Nelson Schools during the board’s regular monthly meeting on Sept. 16, at Lawrence-Nelson High School in Nelson.

 

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Wed
23
Sep
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Putting on a fresh coat

Putting on a fresh coat
Putting on a fresh coat

When the names on the 14-year-old Harvard Veterans Wall started dimming, a group of community members decided to do something about it. The now faded names were reinvigorated with a gold, outdoor paint. Gene Keasling, shown below painting in the letters on a brick, said there are 350 names per the two veterans walls.

 

 

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Wed
23
Sep
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Sutton Council passes new budget

In a rare Sunday night meeting for the Sutton City Council, members of the council passed the 2020-21 fiscal year budget, but not without some concerned taxpayers, citizens and business owners voicing their concerns over a budget item that could potentially add a third police officer to the Sutton Police Department.

 

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Wed
16
Sep
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Election mailers from postal service doesn’t effect Clay County residents

Residents of Clay County may have, or most likely will be receiving a postcard in the mail from the United States Postal Service with instructions on voting by mail.

According to Clay County Clerk Deb Karnatz, this postcard has little effect on residents of the county as the entire county is already a “vote by mail” county, thus the information received from the USPS might not be accurate for Clay County voters.

All registered voters will have their ballots mailed directly to their mailing addresses 22 days prior to the Nov. 3 election.

 

 

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Wed
16
Sep
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Teaching youth farm safety

Teaching youth farm safety

Tymerie Steinhauer, far left, explains what happens to a horse’s ears when you touch a certain part of its head to a group of preschoolers during Sutton Public School’s Farm Safety Day, Monday. 

 

 

 

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Wed
16
Sep
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New communication center to benefit Clay Co. emergency services offices

New communication center to benefit Clay Co. emergency services offices

The former South Central Public Power District building, located at 212 W. Fairfield in Clay Center, was recently purchased for the future Clay County Communications Center. TORY DUNCAN | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

New communication center to benefit Clay Co. emergency services offices

An inside look at the former So. Central Public Power District building. The inside will be renovated to fit the needs of the future communications center. TORY DUNCAN | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

Members of the Clay County Board of Supervisors, along with the Clay County Emergency Management office announced at the Tuesday, Sept. 8 board meeting that the building formally housing offices for the South Central Public Power District, located at 212 W. Fairfield in Clay Center will become the new home for the Clay County Communications Center.

According to EMA Coordinator Tim Lewis, “The board has considered this for a long time, even before I came on board, and in late July, they fast-tracked the effort to move our 911 dispatch and communications center out of the Clay County Jail Center.”

Lewis noted that this change is set to take place around Oct. 8, after remodeling and upgrades are made to the building.

 

 

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Wed
16
Sep
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Sutton police looks to add to staff roster

Sutton police looks to add to staff roster

This display of evidence covers just some of the active cases that the Sutton Police Department is currently investigating. Drug paraphernalia, along with ammunition and numerous weapons are involved with many cases that Sutton officers Tracey Landenberger and Mitch Meyer have been dealing with, adding to their collective hours of work in recent months. TORY DUNCAN | CLAY COUNTY NEWS

Potential burnout due to an increased caseload has spurred the City of Sutton and the Sutton Police Department to contemplate the addition of a third officer to the local department.

Sutton Police Chief Tracey Landenberger, and police officer Mitch Meyer both eluded to an increased caseload of any number of types of cases has led to both officers working no less than 60 hours per week, and at times more.

“It gets to wear on us when you’re working that much and I truly worry about burnout setting into both of us,” Landenberger noted.

 

 

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