Columns

Wed
16
Oct
Edgar's picture

When the dishes start piling up

When the dishes start piling up

RAMBLES

Ashley D. Swanson

ccnashley@gmail.com

When the dishes start piling up it’s the worst thing in the world.

Because what if someone stops by and can clearly see the large stack of pots and pans from a week’s worth of suppers? Or what if they notice the plates and bowls toppling over one another on the counter, slowly making their way into the sink?

When the dishes start piling up, it must mean you don’t care too much about what your home looks like. Because a kitchen is where the heart is, right? Where the meals are made and the counters become messy with memories with the kids and grandkids.

When the dishes start piling up it meant anyone who came into the house was going to judge you, and growing up and even into my early adulthood, that bothered me.

 

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Wed
16
Oct
Edgar's picture

A busy stretch, honoring a mentor

A busy stretch, honoring a mentor

BULL

Tory Duncan • ccntory@gmail.com

Sometimes it just feels that time passes by so quickly. As is the case of the 2019 fall activities season for our area schools. This week will mark what I often times consider as the busy run of the fall sports season, and for that matter, the community activities season. Conference volleyball tournaments are coming up, and fall community activities are taking over the spare time, if you can fit them in.

This Thursday officially begins the run to the end of the fall sports season as our two cross country teams will head to district action, with Harvard’s girls headed to Hastings and the South Central Red Raider teams competing in Aurora for a shot at a state meet berth.

Saturday will see the Harvard volleyball team begin action in the Twin Valley Conference tournament in Kenesaw, while this coming Monday will see Sutton and Sandy Creek square off in the opening round of the Southern Nebraska Conference tournament in Hebron.

 

Wed
02
Oct
Edgar's picture

Hope and healing

Hope and healing

Fischer

Mental illness is a disease similar to any other. It’s not something you can will your way into healing or simply wait for it to pass.

For many, their disease ebbs and flows, and often strikes when they might least expect. For others, it remains an ever-present, unhealed wound.

This year, from Oct. 6 through Oct. 12, Nebraskans and people across our country will unite to demonstrate their support for Mental Illness Awareness Week. Together, we can change perceptions and end the stigma associated with mental illness.

Psychological illnesses are among the most widespread health conditions in the United States–and the numbers are daunting. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 50 percent of Americans will be diagnosed with a mental illness or disorder at some point in their lifetime. One in 25 adults in the United States lives with a serious mental illness, and one in five people will experience a mental illness in a given year.

Wed
02
Oct
Edgar's picture

NE’s manufacturing resurgence

NE’s manufacturing resurgence

Ricketts

October is Manufacturing Month, a time to celebrate the makers, builders, and inventors of Nebraska. Nearly one in 10 jobs in Nebraska is in manufacturing. Thanks to recent job growth, this summer Nebraska’s manufacturing employment reached its highest point in more than 10 years.

The U.S. economy suffered through the Great Recession from December 2007 to June 2009. As a result of the economic downturn, many companies laid off workers or went out of business altogether. Our state’s manufacturing industry was not immune to the Great Recession. From December 2007 to December 2009, Nebraska’s manufacturing employment plummeted from 102,200 to 91,100. That’s a drop of 10.9 percent in just two years.

Wed
02
Oct
Edgar's picture

Expanding mental health access

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Smith

Identifying and treating mental illness is a pressing issue in our country. The National Alliance on Mental Illness estimates one in five U.S. adults experience mental illness each year, while one in 25 adults experience serious mental illness each year. As with most conditions, mental illness can afflict anyone.

We have come a long way as a nation in fighting the stigma of mental illness. Mental illness is no longer the taboo subject it once was, which helps people suffering to know they are not alone. However, we still need to do a better job fighting and treating mental illness itself.

Compounding this serious issue is a lack of access to treatment. Recently, the National Council for Behavioral Health released a study finding mental health services in our country insufficient and “the root of the problem is lack of access–or the ability to find care.” This is especially true in rural America, where access to health care in general can be very challenging.

Wed
02
Oct
Edgar's picture

Let’s encourage engineer corps to ‘manage’ the Mighty Mo

Driving along the Missouri River on either the Nebraska side or through Iowa, Missouri and Kansas leaves one feeling like a frog on a lily pad. There’s water everywhere, mostly in places where it shouldn’t be.

Some roads that were closed since the March ‘Weathermageddon’ have been re-opened, more than once. Many of those are being closed again as the area prepares for another flood, at any minute.

Meanwhile, Nebraska Governor Ricketts and the governors of adjacent states are calling on the Corps of Engineers to make a new game plan concerning management of water in that river.

It might not seem like much in the greater scheme of things, but managing the release of water from Gavins Point Dam might be the only thing man can control. Part of that management includes the strengthening of vital levees along the river and making them taller when possible.

Wed
25
Sep
Edgar's picture

Woes of a photographer; a parody memoir

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No matter where you position yourself on the field or court, they find you.

It’s kind of like they have a magnet in them that’s only attracted to your camera.

I’m talking about referees. And I’m not kidding about the seemingly invisible magnet in them that’s only attracted to your camera.

Photographers understand—or they shouldthat you are a bystander, a person capturing moments of a game, and although you are doing your job and trying to stay out of everyone’s way, they are also doing their job by refereeing a game.

 

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Wed
25
Sep
Edgar's picture

There’s a first time for everything...

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Week in and week out, the activities and events that we cover across Clay County can fill my mind with lots of thoughts... guess what? This week was no different.

This week held a couple of “first time for everything,” if you will.

Key highlights filling my mind began Thursday, as a panelist and breakout session presentor at the Sutton Area Chamber of Commerce’s Career Exploration Day, held in part with the Sutton Public Schools.

Wed
18
Sep
Edgar's picture

Shutter speeds, aperture settings and ISO

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By Tory Duncan

BULL

Getting back to school coverage, on top of may other things that go on throughout the year, can be a challenge. There aren’t many free nights, and when there are, one can always find something to attend or do.

After the first couple of weeks, my biggest and most challenging sport to shoot is, and always has been, volleyball; that challenge continues, at least for me.

After a full year away from it (basically) each year it’s almost like I have to go through spring training sessions again to get the “trigger finger” limbered up. I have to think of all the settings to get just right to shot inside with no flash, so after the first couple of week, I think I’ve found my settings for each of Clay County’s three gymnasiums....I think!

 

Wed
18
Sep
Edgar's picture

MURMAN’S CORNER

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By Sen. Dave Murman

Hello Neighbor,

I think that it’s safe to say that concerns about the property tax crisis that we are facing has become the topic of many conversations. Unfortunately, my colleagues and I were not able to achieve a consensus about how to provide property tax relief to Nebraska property owners this past session. As we slowly approach the upcoming session in January, I thought I’d share a few thoughts.

I believe that LB 289, a comprehensive bill that would have provided full and fair funding to all schools while giving property owners relief that they needed, was the best package that we were going to see this Legislative Session. The bill repealed many sales tax exemptions, raised the sales tax by a half cent, maintained the property tax credit relief fund, etc. Many of the senators in the body and the governor all were opposed to the sales tax exemptions and raising the sales tax because they all campaigned on not raising taxes.

 

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